Tag Archive | Burberry

Instagram Video, Vine, and Other Animals: The Beginning of the Video Era?

“Cinema is the most beautiful fraud in the world.”

Jean-Luc Godard

Although YouTube is definitely one of the most popular things on the Internet, it still looks like the average social media user prefers still images. In fact, the most effective way to get “likes” and “shares” and the rest on Facebook, right now, is by using the good ol’ artwork/image + copy combo.

But now things are going to change for good. If you were stuck in a cabin in Hammerfest, Norway, in the last four days, then you probably don’t know that we now have Instagram Video. Yep. It’s kinda similar to like Vine, which belongs to Twitter, which is Facebook’s worst enemy, nowadays, which means Zuckerberg wants to take over the Internet and get richer then Donald Duck, Donald Trump and Donald Glover put together. Anyway, here’s an article explaining how the Instagram Video vs Vine works.

When it comes to Vine, a few brands/companies are already producing seriously cool things. Wired is one of them.

wiredvine
General Electric, as usual, plays with science and turbines like nobody else.

gevine
Oreo’s videos are sweet, too.

oreovine
A handful of brands already started using Instagram Video, as well. Here’s the omnipresent Burberry.

General Electric, again.

And Michael Kors.

So, what does it all mean, in a nutshell? We don’t know yet. Mashable’s Lance Ulanoff implores ‘Instagram Video: Don’t Make Me Love You’ as he likes Vine but – reluctantly – recognises Instagram Video’s massive potential.
Another article reports that the guys at Vine are well aware of the competitor’s power, therefore “One day before rival Facebook is rumored to announce a Vine competitor, employees of Twitter’s video-sharing service teased several of its new features.” Meanwhile, some analysts warn: ‘Get Ready For TV-Like Ads On Facebook (Eventually) As Video Comes To Instagram.’

The bottom line is, anyway, that things are going to change, once again, and I personally think that video will now become something we have to deal with every day. Finally.

Think about the potentialities of the medium, for brands:

  • Events can be shown and shared through moving image; see fashion shows, gigs, vernissages and the rest.
  • Teasers can be used in order to create suspense for a new product or event coming up.
  • Storytelling is better with video, as the medium is psychologically more engaging and captivating.
  • It’s easier to communicate brand identity and values, with video.

What do you think?
London Web Agency Appnova – keep following us on Twitter @appnova and “like” us on Facebook for useful news and tasteful digressions about geeky stuff.

Burberry Kisses VS Send your Kiss! Caresse by L’Oréal. Stolen Kisses?

Burberry has done something pretty cool, again. When it comes to social media – among other things – the brand is always definitely ahead of the game.

From The Next Web: ‘Kissing online: Google and Burberry let you send a personalized smooch to a loved one.

Kissing someone across the globe has never been more real. With Burberry and Google’s newly-launched sweet little idea to spread some love across the globe in a more personalized way, you get your own kiss imprint to send on to your loved ones (say goodbye to generic images of a kiss!).’

Simply go to Burberry Kisses to send a letter sealed with your kiss. Once there, capture your kiss – or do it on your iPhone, by caressing the screen with your lips, for instance – and some lucky girl/boy will see your love fly away to reach her/him.

Here’s the YouTube video that explains how things work.

But there is a tiny detail. Have a look at the comments to the post on The Next Web, and you will notice that some user posted a link to a very very very similar experiment: Send your Kiss! Caresse by L’Oréal.

Here’s a screenshot.

l'oreal_kiss

A post about it, written a few months ago, by CREAM.

And the video.

What do you think?

London Web Agency Appnova – keep following us on Twitter @appnova and “like” us on Facebook for useful news and tasteful digressions about geeky stuff.

The power of words in the World 2.0 / Feat. Waterstone’s, Burberry, looting crisps and CHAOS by Sylvester Stallone.

Words are extremely powerful, everybody knows that; think of Jesus, Martin Luther King, Jr, ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’, ‘Speaking words of wisdom, let it be’ and so on and so forth.

Words are your brand’s philosophy and identity made sound, but a great deal of companies forget it, very often. Lots of them struggle with language, or use the same vocabulary, mostly made of five words: Stunning, Gorgeous, Lovely, Exclusive, Spotted. Boring, boring, boring, boring. Boring. In other occasions, they simply don’t care, as long as they have some halfway decent copy, they think the product will take care of the rest; but imagine Burberry’s Twitter account going: ‘Yeh we fink r sales are da shiznit init? LOL’. Right, it would look weird.

Now, here’s someone who knows how to use words, whether it’s an in-store pun, a billboard at Camden Town tube station, or on social media. Not surprisingly, they sell books.

Foreword – remember the London riots, in 2011? The city was burning, madness and despair in the streets. In certain areas, every shop was being looted. I mean EVERY shop. In fact, the kids were so desperate to nick stuff, they even looted Poundland (in the image below, you can see a young lady running away with £3 worth of crisps).

poundland

EVERY shop was pillaged, then, but one: Watersone’s.
From The Guardian: ‘Reading the riot acts: why wasn’t Waterstone’s looted?’
London Evening Standard might know the answer: ‘The shop that no rioter wanted to loot… because it sells books’
‘On the worst night of London rioting almost every shop in Clapham Junction was ransacked – except one. The bookshop.’

Someone with basic Photoshop skills tried to manipulate the situation, but the results were quite poor.

looters

Jokes aside, the guys at Waterstone’s reacted the best way ever: with irony, wittiness, and bright words:

riot_sign

They were not new to this. Check the following tweets.

twitter1

twitter2

twitter3

And the in-store jokes.

falkirk-waterstones

And, last but not least, this billboard I spotted the other day at some tube station. Aesthetically speaking, it is indeed one of the worst looking billboards ever (together with CHAOS by Sylvester Stallone, pictured below): mainly black, no attractive women featured, no images. Still, a great piece of advertising.

waterstones_billboard

 

Montegrappa-Chaos-Pen-at-The-Tonight-Show-with-Jay-Leno-city-deluxe-guia-lujo-mundial

The result is an increase in buzz, brand awareness, virality and, ultimately, sales. GENIUS.

What do you think?
London Web Agency Appnova – keep following us on Twitter @appnova and “like” us on Facebook for useful news and tasteful digressions about geeky stuff.

Luxury Beauty Brands 2.0 / How to look classy online, feat. “Snooki” Polizzi, L’Occitane en Provence, The Sanctuary and Josie Maran.

I don’t have a TV set. The last time I had one I was at uni. It was 1997. The other day I went to visit a friend; he’s got a TV set, and suddenly I found myself channel surfing like a young Leroy “The Masochist” Smith in Big Wednesday.

After a little while, I sat and wondered:

snooki

It looks like there are way more Snookis, WAGs, Tulisas, Geordie Shorettes, TOWIE-sque beauties out there than Carole Bouquets, Audrey Hepburns and Zooey Deschanels.

Moreover, brands often – even plush ones – when it comes to social media, tend to adapt their image to the latest trend, which means that several times they end up looking like a chav, i.e. a not very classy individual with an expensive Burberry cap.

It’s true, thanks to gangsta rappers and Reality TV stars now luxury brands are much more ‘street’ than before, LOL and YOLO and the rest, but still, a luxury brand should stay true to its roots and perpetuate the purest ideals of beauty, elegance, and excellence (that means Coco Chanel is a good style icon, Nicki Minaj is not).

So, if you really need to give it a twist, use your brain.

Want to depict immortal beauty and allure? Ask Ellen von Unwerth to take care of the photoshoot, just like The Sanctuary did (and yes, you are right, we created their website ;)).

sanctuary

Want to engage your customers and keep them coming back for more? Choose culture, nature, healthy recipes and Vintage Posters of Provence, instead of OMG-scandal-scoop-unseen-footage-blah-blah-bloody-blah.

Look at L’Occitane en Provence on Pinterest, for instance.

occitane

Want to use Instagram in a different way? Stop posting pictures of parties with Rihanna and Drake, and give us some real pictures, like Josie Maran. She’s a mom and a business woman, and found a way to make these traits live together; moreover, her Instagram images show a brand’s human face, and the real deal, i.e. how to look cool and well-groomed even if you have to take care of a wild 1-year-old baby.

josiemaran

What do you think?

London Web Agency Appnova – keep following us on Twitter @appnova and “like” us on Facebook for useful news and tasteful digressions about geeky stuff.

Tumblr and the “Stylish and F***ed Up Generation”/ Design & Architecture, Sex and the Narcissistic World of Gen Y.

What is Generation Y? Nobody really knows. Academics are confused, sociologists are puzzled, and even leading-edge brands such as Burberry are at sixes and sevens, when it comes to this rather special breed of customers.

According to Wikipedia, ‘Generation Y, also known as the Millennial Generation, is the demographic cohort following Generation X. There are no precise dates for when Generation Y starts and ends. Commentators use beginning birth dates from the latter 1970s, or from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.’

The plot thickens.
I googled the term, and found a handy service from the Financial Times, called Lexicon. Well, I thought, whatever the FT says, it must be at least close to the truth, right? Not so sure about it.
‘Globally, generation Y (gen Y) refers broadly to the demographic cohort born between 1975 and 1995. The group is seen as reliant on new media and digital technology with short attention spans. They expect entertaining and fast-paced information and are assumed to be self-centred, demanding, and hard to integrate into teams.’ The article continues: ‘As consumers, gen Y attracts much attention from market researchers who have realised early on that the group itself has different values, such as placing emphasis on environmental issues, but in other respects gen Y varies between countries.’
The FT describes Gen Y as a pretty capricious, whimsical, quirky and hard to define bunch, then.
The Boston Globe has a little more sympathy for these young fellows: ‘For young people today, the American dream of working hard, saving money, and becoming richer than their parents may be out of reach. Americans in their mid-30s and younger have accumulated less wealth than their parents did at that age more than 25 years ago — a trend that threatens to weaken the economy overall, according to a study by the Urban Institute, which analyzes social and economic problems.’

Now we understand a bit more: Gen Yers have different values, are more narcissistic but also more civic-minded than previous generations, tend to spend a lot of time online – Tumblr, rather than Facebook – and have a tragic sense of beauty. In sum, we can say that: the future seems grim, political correctness is not mandatory anymore, and Gen Y are a stylish, narcissistic, culturally aware and fucked up bunch of souls curating/creating incredibly sparkling and fascinating Tumblr blogs about design, “things I like”, cool stuff, and content that is hotter than a vindaloo.

Here’s three cool Tumblr blogs you should check out, if you want to understand – and eventually sell stuff to, you greedy, impertinent corporation – the Gen Y.

Apple Wayfarers
A perfect snapshot of a certain fringe of Gen Y – the ones who read Jean-Paul Sartre, watch Jean-Luc Godard’s movies listen to Tyler, The Creator and prefer Wolfgang Tillmans over Terry Richardson.

applewayfarers

Life on Sundays
Stylish interiors, details, beautiful objects, stunning images, with a NSFW twist – because pornography is now part of our online lives, and is also getting classier – and a strong melancholic aftertaste.

lifeonsundays

Rolling Thoughts
Exquisiteness and design for the Gen Yers, constantly fluctuating between the bright and dark sides of life: the yin of bikes and cycling and the yang of booze and cheese sandwiches, well-behaved girls smoking and drinking, all wrapped in a fucked up dandy cape.

rollingthoughts

What do you think?
London Web Agency Appnova – keep following us on Twitter @appnova and “like” us on Facebook for useful news and tasteful digressions about geeky stuff.

Burberry, the £4.95 billion business that doesn’t know how to take interesting pictures of London.

Back in the 1980s, people used to visit exotic places and take a gazillion pictures with big black squared point-and-shoot cameras, then come back home, invite people over, give them crackers, salty biscuits and pistachios, show them the gazillion pictures, and bore them to death.

Here’s me riding a camel. Here’s Jen posing in front of the Great Pyramid. Here’s our driver, Rashid, eating ice cream. Here’s Fritz, a German fellow traveller, dancing to Lady Gaga, on the boat, during the Nile cruise.

And so on and so forth, multiplied by a gazillion times.

grandma_picture

We already spent some time explaining why Burberry, AKA one of the toppermost social brands ever, AKA the reference when it comes to all things digital marketing-related, is surprisingly weak on Pinterest (and Instagram), when they talk about London.

I mean, London is not exactly like Hull – two streets, three pubs, fish & chips shop, that’s it – so why are they always posting pictures of Trafalgar Square, Westminster, Tower Bridge and other rather unoriginal stuff?

The only explanation is they hired a team of social media veterans – meaning they are a bunch 75-year-olds accountants with a passion for colourless clichéd holiday photography.

Now, my point is: do you want to show London’s vibe, its characters and countless shades of Majesty and Beauty, in an original and unique – yet organic mummy-friendly – way? Then get inspired here:

eastvillage

Tips, food, places, photos of sheep roaming next to Canary Wharf, parks and green spaces, iconic design, healthy eating, tilt-shift photography, vintage, art and characters. Of course, this is not the perfect Pinterest account, the one scientist will study in the future and social strategists will talk about for many years to come. Yet, although this is not a a £4.95 billion business – like Burberry – they inform and entertain and tell the story of a great place, in a very pleasant way.

Win.

sheepcanarywharf

What do you think?

London Web Agency Appnova – keep following us on Twitter @appnova and “like” us on Facebook for useful news and tasteful digressions about geeky stuff.

Luxury Brands & Instagram / 3 Common BIG Mistakes – feat. Burberry, Tory Burch and Loboutin.

It is normal for us, mere mortals, to make mistakes; our vulnerability, fallibility and unreliability make us do silly things, in life as on Instagram.

Therefore, we are (kind of) excused when posting photos of Starbucks Frappuccinos, pets doing pets’ things, or food.

Yawn.

 

But what about famous luxury brands, with massive budgets, an army of creative minds and technology wizards working in fancy offices in fancy areas, which are suppose to be the avant-garde of a new movement that will change – and eventually save – the world? Yes, they post silly things on Instagram, as well.

 

Three things luxury brands should avoid, when using Instagram – especially considering that the average user is not a 75-year-old spinster living with cats, collecting Royal Family paraphernalia.

 

Wrong or confusing iconography

Icons are often used to show the inspiration behind a collection, or the ideal brand ambassador. So, when it comes to fashion, we usually see photos of Audrey Hepburn and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Alright. Good.

So what is Frida Kahlo – an active communist, a tortured soul and a person uninterested in fashion – doing on Tory Burch’s Instagram account, next to a picture of two fashionistas, whose caption says ‘A serious discussion about the color pink.’?

 

Clichées

I know Burberry is an iconic brand which embodies the esprit of London and so on and so forth, but from a ground-breaking brand, investing heavily in social media, with potentially unlimited firepower, you would expect something more than “Hey, let’s take pictures of London. Like, what about a photo of Tower Bridge??”

How exciting. Wow. Read More…

NO social media, NO website, ignore the Gen Y: FTW! The strange and mysterious case of Massimo Piombo.

Millennials are “skeptical” about luxury brands, Louis Vuitton makes surfboards, Burberry will send a spaceship to Mars; meanwhile, in China, the closing of Wooha.com was followed by the resignation of VIPKu’s CEO and deep cuts in staff at Xiu.com & Shangpin.com.

Bloggers are everywhere, tweeting their way to Fashion Valhalla.

Marc Jacobs gets tattooed by Scott Campbell live, watch it from your iPhone 8 from a Virgin plane.

You can now buy a desert island on The Fancy.

But Massimo Piombo doesn’t care. He does business the old way. They don’t even have a website.

Enlightened genius or irresponsible outsider?

Read More…

VOGUE’s Fashion Night Out 2012 / A personal voyage. Feat. Michael Kors, luxury junk food and scary bearded men

Last night I went to VOGUE’s 2012 Fashion’s Night Out, in Mayfair.

I like fashion – from a sociological point of view and as a fascinating manipulation and adaptation of quasi-art, which suddenly becomes a wearable object, useful and aesthetically appealing at the same time – but I tend to avoid fashion-related events.
It’s like when you enjoy the aesthetics, passion and poetry of football, but you don’t want to join a horde of drunk, testosterone-driven thugs at Boleyn Ground. Read More…